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NSW

NExUS - Geological Interpretation of Aeromagnetic Data – a Practical Approach

Tuesday, August 2, 2022
TBC
TBC

Geological Interpretation of Aeromagnetic Data – a Practical Approach

2-Day Online Workshop, 1st – 2nd August 2022

(Limited to 30 places)

 

NExUS-Professional Development (NExUS-PD) is proud to be able to present this very highly regarded workshop online for the very first time.
• The specially designed two-day online workshop* will introduce the fundamentals of geological interpretation of aeromagnetic data.
• The workshop will feature lectures, practical activities and case studies all using integrated data sets.
• Each day will feature 3 x 2hr sessions with exercises to be completed between the sessions and time allocated for extended discussions.
• The format aims for open, transparent communication, with input from participants highly encouraged to share knowledge and experiences.
*This is a level-4 course (honours level) and is designed to be suitable for early career geoscientists, honours students and HDR students. The workshop is not assessed.

 

Day 1, Methodology of Aeromagnetic Interpretation – David Isles (1st Aug) :
• Sessions will include: Basic Principles, Physics and Concepts of Magnetics, Spatial Concepts, Survey Planning, Processing and Presentation of Data, Anomalies, RTP and Analytical Signal, Modelling and Inversion, Introduction to Golden Dyke Prospect Case Study
Day 2, Geological Interpretation and Structure – Leigh Rankin (2nd Aug) :
• Sessions will include: Golden Dyke Prospect Case Study, Magnetisation in Rocks, Charters Towers Case Study, Structures in Magnetics, Widgiemooltha Case Study, Unusual Magnetisation and Final Q+A session.

To Register, click here. 

Full Registration: $500

AIG and ASEG Members: $400

Students: $50

For further information view this flyer or, please contact: Richard.Lilly@Adelaide.edu.au

NExUS - Geological Interpretation of Aeromagnetic Data – a Practical Approach

Monday, August 1, 2022
TBC
TBC

Geological Interpretation of Aeromagnetic Data – a Practical Approach

2-Day Online Workshop, 1st – 2nd August 2022

(Limited to 30 places)

 

NExUS-Professional Development (NExUS-PD) is proud to be able to present this very highly regarded workshop online for the very first time.
• The specially designed two-day online workshop* will introduce the fundamentals of geological interpretation of aeromagnetic data.
• The workshop will feature lectures, practical activities and case studies all using integrated data sets.
• Each day will feature 3 x 2hr sessions with exercises to be completed between the sessions and time allocated for extended discussions.
• The format aims for open, transparent communication, with input from participants highly encouraged to share knowledge and experiences.
*This is a level-4 course (honours level) and is designed to be suitable for early career geoscientists, honours students and HDR students. The workshop is not assessed.

 

Day 1, Methodology of Aeromagnetic Interpretation – David Isles (1st Aug) :
• Sessions will include: Basic Principles, Physics and Concepts of Magnetics, Spatial Concepts, Survey Planning, Processing and Presentation of Data, Anomalies, RTP and Analytical Signal, Modelling and Inversion, Introduction to Golden Dyke Prospect Case Study
Day 2, Geological Interpretation and Structure – Leigh Rankin (2nd Aug) :
• Sessions will include: Golden Dyke Prospect Case Study, Magnetisation in Rocks, Charters Towers Case Study, Structures in Magnetics, Widgiemooltha Case Study, Unusual Magnetisation and Final Q+A session.

To Register, click here. 

Full Registration: $500

AIG and ASEG Members: $400

Students: $50

For further information view this flyer or, please contact: Richard.Lilly@Adelaide.edu.au

NSW Tech Night - The use of machine learning in processing remote sensing data for mineral exploration

Wednesday, April 20, 2022
1800
1900

Title: The use of machine learning in processing remote sensing data for mineral exploration

Presenter: Dr. Ehsan Farahbakhsh

Date: Wednesday 20th April 2022

Time: 1800-1900

Registration: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_2iHaItV9Sk201SP4ZFkPpw

Overview:

The decline of the number of newly discovered mineral deposits and increase in demand for critical minerals in recent years has led exploration geologists to look for more efficient and innovative methods for processing different data types at each stage of mineral exploration. As a primary step, various features, such as lithological units, alteration types, structures, and indicator minerals, are mapped to aid decision-making in targeting ore deposits. Different types of remote sensing datasets, such as satellite and airborne data, make it possible to overcome common problems associated with mapping geological features. The rapid increase in the volume of remote sensing data obtained from different platforms has encouraged scientists to develop advanced, innovative, and robust data processing methodologies. Machine learning methods can help process a wide range of remote sensing datasets and determine the relationship between components such as the reflectance continuum and features of interest. These methods are robust in processing spectral and ground truth measurements against noise and uncertainties. In this presentation, I will provide a brief introduction to remote sensing data types and review the implementation and adaptation of some popular and recently established machine learning methods for processing different types of remote sensing data aiming at detecting various ore deposit types. I will also review our recent studies on combining remote sensing data and machine learning methods for mapping different geological features that are critical for providing mineral potential maps.

Bio:

Dr. Ehsan Farahbakhsh is a Research Associate in the EarthByte Group, School of Geosciences, University of Sydney. He holds a PhD degree in Mining Engineering - Mineral Exploration from Tehran Polytechnic. He has been involved in several projects as an exploration geologist or spatial data analyst for the exploration industry, primarily for providing prospectivity maps of various ore deposit types from regional to deposit scale. His research interests are multidimensional mineral prospectivity modeling, geological remote sensing, geostatistics, and the application of data science and UAVs in mineral exploration.

Surface wave tomography in engineering: Move over MASW, FTAN is here.

Wednesday, March 16, 2022
1800 (AEDT)
1900 (AEDT)

Title: Surface wave tomography in engineering: Move over MASW, FTAN is here.

Presenter: Dr Craig O’Neil

Date: Wednesday 16th March 2022

Time: 6:00 pm to 7:00 pm AEDT

Registration: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_cAHHIn2YQDe9VOWKmH-T6Q

 

Abstract:

Many large scale civil works, such as dams and foundations, require a detailed knowledge of the shear-wave velocity and elastic properties of the underlying bedrock. These properties determine the earthquake risk and ground acceleration of a dam, or the vibrational response of built structures. Over recent years, multichannel analysis of seismic waves (MASW) has been widely adopted to provide this information, and has been incorporated into engineering guidelines such as ANCOLD.  However, these methods are time intensive, and a high level of interpreter skill is needed to identify phase velocity modes within noisy data, and misinterpretation of fundamental modes can lead to unrealistic geological models.  Here we develop an approach from the research seismology realm - frequency time analysis (FTAN) - to provide an alternative approach. Field acquisition can co-opt existing refraction surveys, and uses a Gaussian-band filtering to identify fundamental and higher group velocity modes in the data, which can be inverted for vertical S-wave velocity structure. I show a number of field examples, and highlight the approache's ability to discern site-specific engineering information such as rock-mass classification, degree of weathering, and earthquake risk to structures. An explosion of development in renewable infrastructure, from wind onshore and offshore wind turbines and foundation characterisation, pumped hydroelectricity schemes, and geothermal reservoir development, is being seen recently, and the FTAN approach offers a reliable and affordable way of characterising local geotechnical properties

Bio:

Dr Craig O’Neill has over 17 years’ experience in geophysics, engineering geology, and computational geoscience. He has utilised geophysical techniques and geological approaches to deliver on diverse projects from groundwater exploration in remote communities, archaeological excavations in Italy, electromagnetics for copper mineralisation, and geothermal characterisation of deep sedimentary basins. He has supervised projects in slope stability and landslide risk in developing countries, drone photogrammetry, and rock mechanics. He developed a geotechnical laboratory and teaching program at Macquarie University, where he was also director of a major Research Centre. He also has a long experience with computational geoscience and machine learning. He has over 74 highly cited Earth Science papers, and was a member of the Australian Academy of Science’s National Committee for Earth Science, where he helped draft the National Decadal Plan

NSW tech night: Geophysical vectors for iron oxide copper-gold (IOCG) exploration: Cloncurry METAL project.

Wednesday, February 16, 2022
1800 AEDT
1900 AEDT

Title: Geophysical vectors for iron oxide copper-gold (IOCG) exploration: Cloncurry METAL project.

Presenter: Dr James Austin (CSIRO)

Date & Time: Wednesday 16th February 2022 at 1800

Registration: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_bLEg37-vT_Gnf2Zm8Dw_Lg

Abstract:

The classic Status Quo of IOCG exploration is “the combined gravity-magnetic high”. Whilst historically successful for IOCG exploration, it is not useful for many Cloncurry “IOCGs”, which may be magnetite-, to hematite- or pyrrhotite-dominated or have negligible dense or magnetic minerals. Many Cloncurry IOCG’s don’t have significant gravity anomalies, some do not have significant magnetic anomalies, and some neither. IOCGs do however have predictable geophysical zonation related to alteration zonation. They tend to form on redox and/or pH gradients and they are structurally controlled. This talk will outline three novel geophysics-based approaches to IOCG exploration. It will explore how metasomatic processes can be translated into geophysical parameters, propose methods to map redox gradients/structures using integrated geophysics and petrophysics and illustrate how anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) data integrated with quantitative mineralogy can objectively map structural controls and predict ore body geometries.

Bio:

Jim studied structural geology and applied geophysics at Macquarie University, in the halcyon days, late last millennia. He gained employment as a cartographer and illustrator on the Australian Geographic Magazine in 1999 and commenced a PhD on the Cloncurry Lineament in 2003. Post PhD Jim worked in mineral exploration, geophysics consulting, and hydrocarbon exploration across Australia. Since joining CSIRO in 2011 Jim’s main passion has been integrating petrophysics with mineralogy, structural geology, and geophysics to better understand the inner workings of mineral deposits. Jim was part of the organising committee for the inaugural AEGC conference in 2018, sat on the ASEG Fedex in 2019, and was president of the NSW branch of the ASEG up until a few moments ago.

2022 ASEG AGM

Thursday, April 7, 2022
1730 AEST
2000 AEST

The 2022 AGM of the Australian Society of Exploration Geophysicists (ASEG) will be held on Thursday, 7 April 2022

 

Join Zoom Meeting at: 17:30 AEST, 18:00 ACST & 15:30 AWST.

Face to Face:  XXXX Brewery, Level 1, Cnr Black &, Paten Street, Milton QLD 4064, 5pm arrival for 5.30pm start

In order to participate in the Zoom AGM 2022, please register no later Friday, 1 April 2022. 

Onlinehttps://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZAtde-gpzsuE9Zyv6QoglSQ5TQqbyAVmnmI

In personhttps://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/aseg-agm-and-talk-role-of-the-oil-and-gas-industry-towards-net-zero-tickets-304470859537

The business of the Annual General Meeting will be:

  • To confirm the minutes of the last preceding general meeting.
  • To receive from the Federal Executive reports on the activities of the Society during the last preceding financial year.
  • To receive and consider the financial accounts and audit reports that are required to be submitted to Members pursuant to the Constitution and to law.
  • To report the ballot results for the election of the new office holders for the Federal Executive.
  • To consider and if agreed approve changes and adopt the ASEG Constitution.
  • To confirm the appointment of financial auditors for 2022.

The AGM will commence with a scientific presentation from Dr. Taku Ide, Head of Carbon at Cleanaway Waste.

Title: The Role of the oil and gas industry towards a net zero future

Reducing, and ultimately reaching net-zero CO2 emissions from fossil fuels are critical to solving the climate challenge. 

Science shows that if we do not achieve net-zero CO2 emissions by 2050, many of the climate events we are witnessing – severe weather events, rising sea levels, ocean acidification and rising temperatures – will continue and likely accelerate, and negatively impact many of the world's key infrastructure, farming practices, and ecosystems that support the modern day economy. Worst impacts will tend to fall on those least responsible for the problem (IPCC 2018) who may not have the means to adapt to the changing world. These implications are motivating companies to reduce their emissions and position their portfolio of goods and services to a 1.5C aligned world. 

There are exciting roles that geophysicists can play in this transition, ranging from developing cost-effective methods to monitor efficacy of carbon capture and storage (CCS), identifying ideal sites for underground hydrogen (H2) storage, reducing uncertainties around rate of sea level rising, and studying other planetary bodies for habitability. 

The talk will share latest findings from climate science that are driving the shift towards decarbonisation, and explore emerging areas where geophysics expertise are critical.

Bio: Dr. Taku Ide holds a BS in Chemical Engineering, and a Masters and Ph.D in Petroleum Engineering, all from Stanford University. Upon graduating, he founded and ran a consulting firm specialised in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and associated risks for global firms, states, and Native American Tribes in the United States. He currently serves as the Head of Carbon at Cleanaway Waste Management to develop its carbon management strategy. 

 

Invitation for candidates for the Federal Executive  

Members of the Federal Executive serve in an honorary capacity. They are all volunteers and ASEG Members are encouraged to consider volunteering for a position on the Executive or on one of its committees. Current members are listed in Preview; please contact one of them if you wish to know more about volunteering for your Society. Self- nominations are encouraged.  

Thank you for your continued support.

Documents:

AAPG - Structural Geology and Our Future - The Role of Tectonic Geoscience in Energy Transition, Focusing on the Asia-Pacific Region

Thursday, July 7, 2022
0800
1900

The AAPG Asia Pacific Region will hold a 2-day Geological Technical Workshop (GTW) in Sydney from 6-7 July 2022.   The theme is Structural Geology and our Future – The Role of Tectonic Geoscience in Energy Transition, Focusing on the Asia-Pacific Region.

The proposed sessions/sub-themes:

  1. Regional tectonic settings - Plate movements within the region; tectonic history; palaeo-tectonic reconstructions
  2. New structural and tectonic techniques: remote sensing; potential fields; digitalisation; data integration; modelling and simulation
  3. Tectonic stresses, faulting and fracture systems, including implications for CO2 sequestration and geothermal/thermodynamic energy
  4. Geomechanics and prediction of trapping configurations
  5. Fold and Thrust Belts in the Asia Pacific Region
  6. Structural controls in base metal, rare Earth, and mineral exploration
  7. Tectonic settings and structural regimes key to Hydrogen and Helium exploration
  8. Impact of tectonics on geohazard assessment and geo-engineering
  9. Structural and fracture understanding for groundwater management

ASEG members are able to register at the AAPG member rate. Additional details can be found here.

AAPG - Structural Geology and Our Future - The Role of Tectonic Geoscience in Energy Transition, Focusing on the Asia-Pacific Region

Wednesday, July 6, 2022
0800
1900

The AAPG Asia Pacific Region will hold a 2-day Geological Technical Workshop (GTW) in Sydney from 6-7 July 2022.   The theme is Structural Geology and our Future – The Role of Tectonic Geoscience in Energy Transition, Focusing on the Asia-Pacific Region.

The proposed sessions/sub-themes:

  1. Regional tectonic settings - Plate movements within the region; tectonic history; palaeo-tectonic reconstructions
  2. New structural and tectonic techniques: remote sensing; potential fields; digitalisation; data integration; modelling and simulation
  3. Tectonic stresses, faulting and fracture systems, including implications for CO2 sequestration and geothermal/thermodynamic energy
  4. Geomechanics and prediction of trapping configurations
  5. Fold and Thrust Belts in the Asia Pacific Region
  6. Structural controls in base metal, rare Earth, and mineral exploration
  7. Tectonic settings and structural regimes key to Hydrogen and Helium exploration
  8. Impact of tectonics on geohazard assessment and geo-engineering
  9. Structural and fracture understanding for groundwater management

ASEG members are able to register at the AAPG member rate. Additional details can be found here.

NSW Tech Talk: New insights into sedimentary processes on the margin of the Great Barrier Reef from the reprocessing of historical seismic reflection data.

Wednesday, November 17, 2021
1800
2000

ASEG NSW Tech Talk

Presenter:James Daniell (Fender Geophysics)

Title: New insights into sedimentary processes on the margin of the Great Barrier Reef from the reprocessing of historical seismic reflection data.

Registration: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_7aC3mTsMTwK4YogAYam53A

Description

Mixed siliciclastic–carbonate margins receive significant amounts of both terrigenous siliciclastic material from rivers and carbonate material from biogenic sources. The Great Barrier Reef (GBR) is the largest mixed siliciclastic-carbonate margin on earth and detailed stratigraphic analysis is a key tool for understanding the evolution of this sedimentary system; however, the stratigraphy of the offshore central GBR is poorly understood due to its designation as a UNSECO World Heritage Site. This designation limited the acquisition of reflection seismic data over the GBR and has prevented detailed stratigraphic analysis of the reef and its margins. Geoscience Australia conducted limited seismic surveys over the GBR during the 1970-80s though much of this data has remained unprocessed and subsequently unpublished. Key results from this research are:

1. Significant improvements can be made to the seismic reflection data by applying modern processing algorithms.
2. Shelf-edge deltas near Townsville are preserved by their deposition on to an upper slope broad, low gradient terrace which also limits the transport of coarse sediment downslope. Their ‘lobe’ shape indicates a supply dominated environment.
3. Shelf-edge deltas from the Grafton and Flora Passages are clearly incised by submarine canyons that transport sediment downslope. In the Cairns region shelf-edge deltas have a cuspate form and indicate a wave dominated environment.
4. Reef growth is common on the topsets and upper forests of these deltas indicating that these coarse sedimentary environments are favourable for coral colonisation; therefore, as the shelf extends due to lowstand delta deposition, new habitats are also created for coral reefs.
5. The process driving the clear differences between the northern and central GBR is not well understood; however, ongoing subsidence of the central GBR likely plays a significant role.

Sedimentary processes at the margin of the GBR are clearly diverse. Documenting these differences will aid the interpretation of other modern mixed margins and those in the geological record.

Sixth International Conference on Engineering Geophysics (ICEG)

Thursday, October 28, 2021
1130 GMT
1600 GMT

ASEG is pleased to announce its collaboration with SEG for the highly anticipated Sixth International Conference on Engineering Geophysics (ICEG) that will be held from 25 - 28 Oct 2021 Virtual | Cape town South Africa.  This provides us the opportunity to provide all ASEG Members to ATTEND virtually with an interactive an immersive experience and the ability to connect with like-minded individuals from across the globe.

 

ASEG members receive a discounted price of $250 USD by contacting Suba Jaganathan on sjaganathan@seg.org.

ICEG 2021 will concentrate on global innovation, creativity, advances, and new approaches in the field of engineering/environmental geophysics and related fields. In addition to the core engineering/environmental and geotechnical focuses of this coming event, special sessions in related applications of archaeology, energy and forensic geophysics will be included. 

 

To view the entire technical programme, please visit our website where you can download it.

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