Industry

SA/NT Tech Night - A Holistic Subduction/ Metasomatized Lithosphere Model for Orogenic Gold Deposits

Thursday, June 20, 2019
17:30
19:30

The ASEG SA/NT branch will meet on Thursday 20th June at 5:30 pm for a 6:15 pm start. 

We have Emeritus Professor David Groves speaking on, 'A Holistic Subduction/ Metasomatized Lithosphere Model for Orogenic Gold Deposits. '

David was recognised as a National Geoscience Champion by the Australian Geoscience Council in 2018, and we are honoured to have him present to us. 

https://www.agc.org.au/geoscience-in-australia/national-geoscience-champ...

Details:

Date and time: Thursday 20th June, 5:30 pm for 6:15 pm start

Cost: Free for ASEG members and students, $10 for non-members

Venue: Balcony Room, Hotel Richmond, 128 Rundle Mall, Adelaide, 5000

RSVP: Via Eventbrite (RSVP only, payment for non members to be paid in cash at the door)

https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/national-geoscience-champion-emeritus-pr...

Hope to see you there!

 

Abstract

A holistic model for the origin of orogenic gold deposits and its implications for exploration

The term orogenic gold deposit has been widely accepted for the majority of gold-only lode-gold deposits, but there has been continuing debate on their genesis. Early syn-sedimentary or syn-volcanic models and hydrothermal meteoric-fluid models are now invalid. Magmatic-hydrothermal models, except for rare examples of intrusion-related gold deposits, fail because of the lack of consistent spatially –associated granitic intrusions and inconsistent temporal relationships. The most plausible, and widely-accepted models involve metamorphic fluids, but the source of these fluids continues to be hotly debated. Intra-basin sources within deeper segments of the hosting supracrustal successions, the underlying continental crust, subducted oceanic lithosphere with its overlying sediment wedge, and metasomatized lithosphere are all potential sources. Several features of Precambrian orogenic gold deposits are inconsistent with derivation from a continental metamorphic fluid source. These include the presence of hypozonal deposits in amphibolite-facies domains, the proposed source region of the metamorphic fluids, their anomalous multiple sulfur isotopic compositions, and problems of derivation of gold-related elements from devolatilization of dominant basalts in the sequences. The Phanerozoic deposits are largely described as hosted in greenschist facies domains, consistent with supracrustal devolatilization models. A notable exception are the deposits of the giant Jiaodong gold province of China, where ca 120 Ma gold deposits are hosted in Precambrian crust that was metamorphosed over 2000 million years prior to gold mineralization. Other deposits in China are comparable to those in the Massif Central of France, in that they are hosted in amphibolite-facies domains or clearly post-date regional metamorphic events imposed on hosting supracrustal sequences. If all orogenic gold deposits have a common genesis, the only realistic source of fluid and gold is from devolatilizion of a subducted oceanic slab with its overlying gold-bearing sulfide-rich sedimentary package, or the associated metasomatized mantle wedge, with CO2 released during decarbonation and S and ore-related elements released from transformation of pyrite to pyrrhotite at about 500°C. Although this model satisfies all geological, geochronological, isotopic and geochemical constraints, and is consistent with limited computer-based modelling of fluid release from subduction zones the precise mechanisms of fluid flux, like many other subduction-related processes, are model-driven and remain uncertain.

In terms of exploration significance, the model confirms the ubiquitous distribution in paleo-subduction environments of all geological ages. It stresses the importance of lithosphere-tapping fault and shear zone systems that can tap fluids from the Moho and below. It also de-emphasizes reliance on exploration in greenschist-facies terranes, opening up opportunities in less-explored amphibolite-facies terranes. In fact, some of the more recent orogenic gold discoveries were made in amphibolite terranes in Western Australia (e.g. Tropicana) and Quebec, Canada (e.g. Eleonore).  

 

Bio

David Groves was born in Brighton, England, and migrated to Tasmania where he was educated at Hobart High School and at the University of Tasmania, completing a PhD under the mentorship of Mike Solomon. After a period with the Geological Survey of Tasmania, David was appointed Lecturer in Economic Geology at the University of Western Australia (UWA) in 1972. In 1987, he was awarded a Personal Chair at UWA and formed the Centre for Strategic Mineral Deposits, which morphed into the Centre for Global Metallogeny, with him as Director, and which became the Centre for Exploration Targeting after his retirement as Emeritus Professor. He had a very successful academic career in terms of highly-cited published papers and book chapters, keynote and invited lectures, and mentorship of many outstanding postgraduates, being awarded 12 medals and prizes, including the SEG Silver and Penrose Gold Medals and the SGA-Newmont Gold Medal, and being inducted into the Australian Academy of Sciences as a Fellow. Since his retirement from UWA, David has continued to write papers and mentor staff and students at the China University of Geosciences in Beijing (CUGB), as well as consult to industry, being involved in discovery of two > 1Moz gold deposits during greenfield exploration in Tanzania and Ethiopia.

In 2018, he was made a National Geoscience Champion by the Australian Geoscience Council and recognized as one of the 125 Faces of Geoscience by the Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. In recent years, David has also published three novels, with “The Plagues’ Protocol” having a “geological detective” as the main left-field thinking character. He has also commenced writing novels for a Chinese audience, the first in press being “Destiny on Magic White Mountain”, again with a strong mineral exploration background. He hopes to help popularize geology through his novels as part of his role as National Geoscience Champion.

 

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ASEG-WA: Networking Workshop

Thursday, May 30, 2019
17:00
19:00

The Joint Industry Mentoring Program is hosting a Networking Workshop open to all ASEG members on May 30th and will feature a presentation by Ron Gibson (https://gonetworking.com.au/). After the workshop, networking will never be the same. You will be equipped with tools to make your efforts very effective and efficient. You will have some strategies to use and an in depth understanding of how to build out your network.

 

Ron Gibson (GoNetworking) is a creative, on-the-edge speaker whose expertise on in-person and referral marketing is well renowned. Known for presentations, seminars and keynote addresses that are funny, insightful and blunt. Real world, hitting the nail squarely on the head, Ron gives his audience information they can use right away to make more sales, close more business and build relationships.

 

NOTE: Complementary food will be provided, and the venue will have a cash bar for members to purchase beverages.

 

REGISTER here: http://www.spe-wa.org/event/industry-mentoring-workshop-networking/

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WA Tech Night: The Growth of Automation in Marine Seismic Acquisition and Processing

Wednesday, July 10, 2019
17:30
19:00

The Growth of Automation in Marine Seismic Acquisition and Processing

Andrew Long 

(Chief Scientist & Technology Analyst, PGS)

 

Oil and gas exploration is one of countless industries starting to embrace digitalization platforms, robotization, and various other forms of automation to improve the efficiency of the related processes involved in how the data are delivered. Some grandiose proposals in industry forums today include seismic processing-to-drilling workflows with timeframes of only a few days being achievable. I present several examples of how autonomous robotization is augmenting marine seismic acquisition, the use of simulation and remote control facilities for managing field operations, current bottlenecks to real time acquisition and processing, directions in AI and deep learning for seismic processing and imaging (including analogues to the minerals industry), and consider the challenges of significantly reduced human interaction to the management of future projects. This presentation is designed as a broad overview rather than presenting commercial solutions.

 

Andrew Long has a B.Sc. in physics and geophysics from Melbourne University, a PGrad.Dip.App.Physics in petroleum geophysics from Curtin University, and a Ph.D. in geophysics from the University of Western Australia. His career includes experience with land seismic acquisition and processing, satellite altimetry R&D for producing marine gravity products, and postdoctoral research in seismic imaging and crustal geophysics at Stanford University, before joining PGS in 1997. He is now Chief Scientist and Technology Analyst, with interests in most areas of seismic technology and the interpretation of geophysical data. Andrew was an SEG Honorary Lecturer for the Pacific South region in 2009; has presented various courses on seismic-related geophysics for the SEG, EAGE and ASEG; and is a member of ASEG, PESA, EAGE, SEG and SEAPEX.

Please register using the link below:

Register Here

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WA Tech Night: Recent advances in land seismic acquisition technology

Wednesday, June 12, 2019
17:30
19:00

Recent advances in land seismic acquisition technology

Dr Tim Dean 

 

(Research Fellow - Curtin University, Exploration Geophysics)

 

Despite a downturn in the land seismic acquisition industry the pace of technical innovation has not slowed; in just the last four years there have been ten new land seismic acquisition systems introduced.  These new systems are lighter, record data for longer, and produce higher quality data than those previously available.  Advances have not been restricted to the receiver side, with new seismic sources and positioning systems being introduced.  In this presentation I outline these recent advances and will show samples of many of the new nodes that have been introduced. 

 

Tim has an Honours degree in Geophysics from Curtin University and a PhD in Physics from the University of New South Wales.  He spent more than twelve years working for WesternGeco and Schlumberger in a variety of roles related to surface and borehole seismic acquisition including field operations, software development and research located in Saudi Arabia, England, Norway and Australia.  After leaving Schlumberger he worked as a sports technology Project Advisor at Hawk-eye innovations (a division of Sony).  He joined the Department of Exploration Geophysics at Curtin University as a Research Fellow in August 2016.

 

REGISTER HERE: https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/aseg-wa-2019-june-tech-meeting-tickets-62135746691

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SEG DISC 2019: Physics and Mechanics of Rocks: A Practical Approach

Tuesday, August 20, 2019
09:00
17:00

 See here for more details adn registration: https://seg.org/Education/Courses/DISC/2019-DISC-Manika-Prasad

Intended Audience

  • Seismic imagers and interpreters who want to learn how fluids, stress, and other environmental effects change seismic signatures
  • Geophysicists who wish to derive rock properties and constrain well-to-seismic ties
  • Geologists and sedimentologists looking to develop predictive models of sedimentary environments and stratigraphic events
  • Reservoir engineers to build porosity, permeability, and fluid coverage models for reservoir simulations using 3D and 4D seismic data
  • Basin modelers and completions engineers to evaluate stresses from well log and seismic data
  • Geoscientists doing formation evaluation and well logging interpretations
  • Basin managers and team leaders who wish to evaluate the accuracy of predictions and understand risk and errors in models

Prerequisites (Knowledge/Experience/Education Required)

Attendees should have an understanding of basic rock properties such as porosity, permeability, sediment compositions and depositions, and structural geology. It will be helpful to have familiarity, but not necessarily expertise, in seismic properties. The accompanying textbook will include mathematical details, data and problem solutions for mineral modulus calculations, rock stiffness calculations for textural symmetries, velocity binning in flow zones, pore stiffness, and Gassmann fluid substitution. The lecture will focus on fundamental rock physics principles, applications, and analysis of results.

Course Outline

The course is organized into two main sections: Section I. Rock Physics Fundamentals (introductory section) and II. Advanced Topics in Rock Physics (application section):

Rock physics fundamentals

In this section, I will:

  • Review fundamental principles underlying rock physics, and rock properties
  • Investigate the effects of fluids on rock properties
  • Derive basic rock physics correlations and explain why and how they work
  • Review rock properties that can be mapped with remote sensing

Advanced Topics in Rock Physics

In this section, the student is introduced to:

  • Poroelasticity
  • Attenuation and dispersion
  • Geomechanics
  • Complex electrical conductivity and permeability
  • Investigate the causes for complications and deviations from basic correlations
  • Examine existing empirical and theoretical models
  • Discuss selected case studies in rock physics

Learner Outcomes

On completion of the course, the learner should be able to

  • Describe and explain the applications of rock physics for reservoir characterization, formation evaluation, and field monitoring
  • Identify and evaluate existing and potential technologies applicable to rocks physics and rock mechanics for reservoir/formation studies
  • Identify, list, and describe the physical properties of rock, and relate these properties to the mechanical behavior of rocks
  • interpret and predict the effect of mineral properties (e.g. clay minerals) on the load-bearing capacity and strength of rocks
  • Integrate and model elastic wave propagation, electrical conductivity, and fluid flow in rocks
  • Evaluate and assess errors in experimental data, uncertainty, and the value of theoretical models
  • Develop expertise in rock physics interpretations of seismic and electrical conductivity to identify fluids and quantify saturations
  • Gather key strengths in rock physics interpretations by developing a broad understanding of existing or potential technology transfers between engineering and earth science fields that relate rock physics to reservoir geophysics and reservoir engineering
  • Gain knowledge and expertise to understand physical and mechanical behavior of rocks through examples of stress-dependent changes in strains, seismic velocity, electrical conductivity, and pore structure
  • Interpret rock physics and rock mechanics data and model elastic wave propagation, electrical conductivity, and fluid flow in rocks
  • Assess errors in experimental data, assess the uncertainty and the value of rock physics models
  • These learning objectives will allow geoscientists and engineers to:
  • Distinguish major trends in and control factors for velocity and impedance changes in the subsurface
  • Describe and evaluate velocity and impedance data for changes in fluids and stresses
  • Apply basic rock physics techniques to evaluate reservoirs
  • Identify and select the best practice workflows when using rock physics for seismic interpretations
  • Analyze complex conductivity data to interpret reservoir properties

 

Abstract

Rock physics is an interdisciplinary branch of geophysics that explains geophysical remote sensing data, such as seismic wave velocities and electrical conductivity, in the context of mineralogy, fluid content, and environmental conditions. Thus, rock physics interpretations often require inputs from physics, geology, chemistry, chemical engineering, and other fields. For example, seismic waves travel faster in cemented rocks than in loose sediments. Since the physical behavior of rocks controls their seismic response, rock physics brings key knowledge that helps with the interpretation of rock properties such as porosity, permeability, texture, and pressure. Rock physics combines indirect geophysical data (such as seismic impedance, sonic log velocities, and laboratory measurements) with petrophysical information about porosity, fluid type, and saturation for use in reservoir characterization, evaluation, and monitoring. Typically, rock physics is used by petroleum engineers doing reservoir simulations, geologists evaluating over-pressures and making basin models, and anyone doing a monitoring survey to map fluids from 4D seismic. For all such purposes, an understanding of wave propagation is required to relate seismic properties (e.g. velocity and attenuation) to the physical properties of rocks and to evaluate seismic data in terms of subsurface petrophysical parameters.  For example, an application of rock physics is seen in 4D seismic data (i.e. repeated seismic data acquired from the same field), where fluid saturation changes are evaluated from changes in velocity using fluid substitution models. Another rock physics application is to understand and predict the effect of clay minerals on the load-bearing capacity and strength of rocks using fundamental knowledge about the properties of clay minerals (e.g. CEC, surface area, dispersability, charge, sorption, plasticity, etc.), the clay water content, as well as the effects of their distribution within the rock. Thus, an effective prediction of rock properties from indirect measurements requires a solid understanding of the physical behavior of rocks under in situ conditions of pore and confining pressures and fluid saturations.

During this one-day short course, I will provide the earth scientist and engineer with a foundation in rock physics to describe the physical processes that govern the response of rocks to the external stresses essential for reservoir characterization. The course will also offer practical guidance to help better analyze existing data. A major goal of this course is to offer practical instruction and provide working knowledge in the areas of rock physics and rock mechanics for rock characterization.

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