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VIC

SEG Distinguished Lecturer Tour: Boris Gurevich

Wednesday, March 13, 2019
17:30
19:00

2019 Pacific South Honorary Lecturer Tour

Seismic attenuation, dispersion, and anisotropy in porous rocks: Mechanisms and Models
Boris Gurevich, Curtin University and CSIRO, Perth, Australia

Understanding and modeling of attenuation of elastic waves in fluid-saturated rocks is important for a range of geophysical technologies that utilize seismic, acoustic, or ultrasonic amplitudes. A major cause of elastic wave attenuation is viscous dissipation due to the flow of the pore fluid induced by the passing wave. Wave-induced fluid flow occurs as a passing wave creates local pressure gradients within the fluid phase and the resulting fluid flow is accompanied with internal friction until the pore pressure is equilibrated. The fluid flow can take place on various length scales: for example, from compliant fractures into the equant pores (so-called squirt flow), or between mesoscopic heterogeneities like fluid patches in partially saturated rocks. A common feature of these mechanisms is heterogeneity of the pore space, such as fractures, compliant grain contacts, or fluid patches. Using theoretical calculations and experimental data, we will explore how this heterogeneity affects attenuation, dispersion, and anisotropy of porous rocks. I will outline a consistent theoretical approach that quantifies these phenomena and discuss rigorous bounds for attenuation and dispersion.

Time table

Date State Venue Start time Contact
13 March WA Celtic Club, 2nd floor, 48 Ord Street, West Perth 18:00 Heather Tompkins
15 March ACT Geoscience Australia 12:30 James Goodwin
19 March Qld XXXX brewery (Alehouse), Black Street, Milton 17:30 Ron Palmer
20 March NSW 95-99 York St 18:00 Mark Lackie
21 March Vic The Kelvin Club 18:00 Seda Rouxel
25 March SA/NT Coopers Alehouse 18:00 Kate Robertson
27 March Tas Geology Lecture Theatre, University of Tasmania 13:00 Mark Duffett

Biography

Boris Gurevich has an MSc in geophysics from Moscow State University (1976) and a PhD from Institute of Geosystems, Moscow, Russia (1988), where he began his research career (1981–1994). In 1995–2000 he was a research scientist at the Geophysical Institute of Israel, where he focused mainly on diffraction imaging problems. Since 2001, he has been a professor of geophysics at Curtin University and advisor to CSIRO (Perth, Western Australia). At Curtin he has served as Head of Department of Exploration Geophysics (2010–2015) and since 2004 as director of the Curtin Reservoir Geophysics Consortium. He has served on editorial boards of Geophysics, Journal of Seismic Exploration, and Wave Motion. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Physics and has more than 100 journal publications in the areas of rock physics, poroelasticity, seismic theory, modeling, imaging, and monitoring of CO2 geosequestration. His research achievements include development of advanced theoretical models of seismic attenuation and dispersion in heterogeneous porous rocks.

Sponsors

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Victorian Branch Technical night:

Thursday, March 21, 2019
18:00
19:00

Please join us on the 21st of March 2019 from 6pm at the Kelvin Club, to listen to this year’s Asia Pacific SEG honorary lecturer.  We will have the pleasure in welcoming Prof. Boris Gurevitch from Curtin University, who will present his latest work on Seismic attenuation, dispersion, and anisotropy in porous rocks: Mechanisms and Models.

Understanding and modeling of attenuation of elastic waves in fluidsaturated rocks is important for a range of geophysical technologies that utilize seismic, acoustic, or ultrasonic amplitudes. A major cause of elastic wave attenuation is viscous dissipation due to the flow of the pore fluid induced by the passing wave. Wave-induced fluid flow occurs as a passing wave creates local pressure gradients within the fluid phase and the resulting fluid flow is accompanied with internal friction until the pore pressure is equilibrated. The fluid flow can take place on various length scales: for example, from compliant fractures into the equant pores (so-called squirt flow), or between mesoscopic heterogeneities like fluid patches in partially saturated rocks. A common feature of these mechanisms is heterogeneity of the pore space, such as fractures, compliant grain contacts, or fluid patches. Using theoretical calculations and experimental data, we will explore how this heterogeneity affects attenuation, dispersion, and anisotropy of porous rocks. I will outline a consistent theoretical approach that quantifies these phenomena and discuss rigorous bounds for attenuation and dispersion.

Full abstract and biography are available in the Eventbrite registration link.  Please register before COB on 18/03/2019.  For all dietary requirements, please email vicpresident@aseg.org.au directly.

The event is sponsored by Shell

 

 

Victorian Branch Technical night: Integration of geological uncertainty into geophysical inversion by means of local gradient regularization

Thursday, February 21, 2019
18:00
19:30

You are cordially invited to our first technical meeting of the year to be held on 21st of February 2019, at the Kelvin Club from 6 pm.  We will have the pleasure in welcoming Jeremie Giraud from the University of Western Australia who will present his research on " Integration of geological uncertainty into geophysical inversion by means of local gradient regularization"

 

Abstract

We introduce a workflow integrating geological modelling uncertainty information to constrain gravity inversions. We test and apply this approach to the Yerrida Basin (Western Australia), where we focus on prospective greenstone belts beneath sedimentary cover. Geological uncertainty information is extracted from the results of a probabilistic geological modelling process using geological field data and their inferred accuracy as inputs. The uncertainty information is utilized to locally adjust the weights of a minimum-structure gradient-based regularization function constraining geophysical inversion. Our results demonstrate that this technique allows geophysical inversion to update the model preferentially in geologically less certain areas. It also indicates that inverted models are consistent with both the probabilistic geological model and geophysical data of the area, reducing interpretation uncertainty. The interpretation of inverted models reveals that the recovered greenstone belts may be shallower and thinner than previously thought.

 

Bio

Jérémie studied physics and geosciences at undergraduate level in Grenoble and obtained his MSc. Eng. (geophysics) in Strasbourg (France). Various internships have led him to Canada and Germany working on hydrogeophysics and magnetotellurics in research institutes and on reservoir mapping for industry. He then worked for Schlumberger for about three years where he focussed on reservoir appraisal and characterization using geophysical integration techniques. He was based in Milan, Italy and trained mostly in Houston before moving to Perth to start his PhD at the Centre for Exploration Targeting (Uni. of WA), focusing on multidisciplinary geophysical integration. Jérémie submitted his thesis in September 2018 and is now involved in the MinEx CRC and Loop consortia.

 

Registration (before 20 February)

Eventbrite link

2018 SEG/AAPG Distinguished Lecturer: Satish Singh

Tuesday, August 7, 2018
17:30
19:00

Seismic Full Waveform Inversion for Fundamental Scientific and Industrial Problems.

Seismic waveform inversion is a powerful method used to quantify the elastic property of the subsurface. Although the development of seismic waveform inversion started in the early 1980s and was applied to solve scientific problems, it became popular in industry only about 15 years ago. One of the key elements in the success of seismic waveform inversion has been the increase of the acquisition of long offset seismic data from 3 km in the early 1990s to more than 15 km today. Not only did long offset data provide refraction arrivals, but it also allowed recording of wide-angle reflections, including critical angles, providing unique information about the subsurface geology.

In this talk, I will elaborate on the early development of the seismic full waveform inversion (FWI) and its application to solve fundamental scientific problems. The first big success of FWI was its application to gas hydrate reflections, also known as bottom simulating reflection (BSR), which showed that the
BSRs are mainly due the presence of a small amount of free methane gas, not a large amount of hydrates stored above the BSR, and hence the total amount of methane stored in marine sediments should be much less than previously estimated. A second major success of FWI was its application to quantify the characteristics of the axial melt lens observed beneath ocean spreading centers. The seismic full waveform inversion results show that one can distinguish between pure melt and partially molten mush within a 50 m thick melt lens, allowing to link the melt delivery from the mantle with the hydrothermal circulation on the seafloor. The application of full waveform inversion to spreading center problems has become an important area of research.

Unlike in sedimentary environment, the seafloor in general scientific environment could be very rough and water depth could be deep, making it very difficult to use the conventional method of background velocity estimation. To address this issue, the surface seismic data could be downward continued to the seafloor, as if both streamer and sources were placed on the seafloor, similar to land geometry. This method allows to bring the refraction starting from zero offset to far offset, which is extremely useful for full waveform inversion of first arrivals. The downward continuation also allows to reduce the seafloor diffraction, increase the moveout of reflection arrivals, and enhance wide-angle reflections, all important for seismic full waveform inversion. The application of a combination of downward continuation and FWI has allowed to quantify gas anomalies in sedimentary basins and fluids at subduction fronts. The waveform inversion also has been used to monitor CO 2 sequestration.

I will explain the intricacy of FWI, based on the physics of waves, specifically the role of amplitudes and converted waves in addressing fundamental scientific problems. The presentation should interest professionals working in the oil and gas sectors, or crustal studies and global seismology.

More details and biography.

Date City Address
30 July Brisbane  
1 August Canberra Scrivener Room, Geoscience Australia, CANBERRA
2 August Victoria Kelvin Club, 18-30 Melbourne Place, MELBOURNE
7 August Adelaide Coopers Alehouse, 316 Pulteney St ADELAIDE
8 August Sydney The University of Sydney
14 August Hobart CODES Conference Room, University of Tasmania, Sandy Bay
15 August Perth Ground Floor, 1 Ord St, WEST PERTH

SEG DISC Short Course: Accompanying technical talk

Thursday, July 12, 2018
17:30
18:00

Finding and exploiting correlations between 3D seismic, log, and engineering data using machine learning or

The future requirements of integrated E&P: Shallow learning – but deep thinking!

Kurt Marfurt's SEG DISC will tour Australia between 11 and 25 July. After each day-long course, Kurt will speak at selected branch technical nights. These talks may be attended by members and non-members alike as with any technical night.

 

Date City Address
12 July Perth Ground Floor, 1 Ord Street, West Perth
17 July Adelaide Tuesday 17th July at the Hotel Tivoli at 265 Pirie St, Adelaide
19 July Melbourne  
24 July Canberra  
26 July Brisbane  

Please check this page for updates on course locations and times in your city. Some of these talks will talk place over lunch.

The day-long course is aimed at:

  • Seismic interpreters who want to extract more information from their data.
  • Seismic processors and imagers who want to learn how their efforts impact subtle stratigraphic and fracture plays.
  • Sedimentologists, stratigraphers, and structural geologists who use large 3D seismic volumes to interpret their plays within a regional, basin-wide context.
  • Reservoir engineers whose work is based on detailed 3D reservoir models and whose data are used to calibrate indirect measures of reservoir permeability.
  • Team leaders who wish to identify advances in machine learning technology that promise improved efficiency and accuracy in the integration of large data volumes.

SEG DISC Short Course

Wednesday, July 11, 2018
09:00
18:00

Kurt Marfurt's SEG DISC will tour Australia between 11 and 25 July using the schedule

Date City Address
11 July Perth Tech Park Function Centre, 2 Brodie Hall Drive, Bentley
16 July Adelaide Hotel Richmond, 128 Rundle Mall, Adelaide, SA 5000
18 July Melbourne The Kelvin Club, 14-30 Melbourne Place , Melbourne 3000
23 July Canberra The Scrivener Room at Geoscience Australia, corner of Jerrabomberra Ave and Hindmarsh Drive, Symonston ACT 2609
25 July Brisbane Christie Corporate Centre, 320 Adelaide Street, Brisbane 4000

Please check this page for updates on course locations in your city.

The course is aimed at:

  • Seismic interpreters who want to extract more information from their data.
  • Seismic processors and imagers who want to learn how their efforts impact subtle stratigraphic and fracture plays.
  • Sedimentologists, stratigraphers, and structural geologists who use large 3D seismic volumes to interpret their plays within a regional, basin-wide context.
  • Reservoir engineers whose work is based on detailed 3D reservoir models and whose data are used to calibrate indirect measures of reservoir permeability.
  • Team leaders who wish to identify advances in machine learning technology that promise improved efficiency and accuracy in the integration of large data volumes.

More course details and registration here.

Technical Night

Thursday, July 27, 2017
18:00
20:00

Bala Kunjan, from CUE Energy Ltd, will talk to the topic: " The challenges with Exploration Chance of Success Predictions and suggestions to manage them.”

Although the examples used in the presentation pertain to oil and gas exploration, the ideas are more generally applicable in all areas of exploration predictions, so don’t hesitate to attend -- your worst COS outcome is free drinks!

A detailed abstracted is provided in the registration link below:

https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/aseg-technical-meeting-tickets-36351904525

Please RSVP before the 26/07/2017 COB using the above provided link:

Please advise of special dietary requirements by emailing vicpresident@aseg.org.au

March for Science

Saturday, April 22, 2017
12:00
14:00

The March for Science is a global event bringing together people from all walks of life who say we need more evidence and reason in our political process. We champion the public discovery, distribution, and understanding of scientific knowledge as crucial to the freedom, success, health, and safety of life on this planet.

We are a nonpartisan group, marching to promote stable public science funding, open communication of science, evidence-based policy, and greater scientific literacy and education in critical thinking.

All people who value the role of science in society are encouraged to take part in the March for Science.

More details, including specifics for your capital city, at the March for Science.

ASEG - Three years in the marine exploration world & AGM

Thursday, March 16, 2017
18:00
20:00

Dear Victorian members,

Please join us on the 16th of March, for our monthly technical meeting.

This time we will have the pleasure to welcome Warren Gray from SeisIntel. Warren's talk  titled "Three years in the marine exploration world", will give a review of the seismic exploration evolution over these last three  difficult years.

The talk will be followed by the Annual General Meeting.

Please RSVP before the 14th of March COB using the link below:

https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/three-years-in-the-marine-exploration-world-and-agm-tickets-32426287900

Science in the Surveys 2017

Tuesday, March 28, 2017
09:00
17:00

IMPEDIMENTS TO EXPLORATION SUCCESS: SOLUTIONS AND IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES

Come along and discover the outstanding science being conducted by Australia’s geological surveys, CSIRO, UNCOVER and the DET CRC.

Registration: There is no cost for attendance, however numbers are limited, so please register to attend https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/science-in-the-surveys-2017-tickets-31618985236

This year’s event will be hosted by the Geological Survey of Victoria. Take the opportunity to directly engage with senior government geoscientists. Learn how their teams are working to improve understanding of Australia’s geology, its mineral potential, and the exploration opportunities it presents. Industry professionals, researchers, government, sector stakeholders and geoscience students are invited to attend.

Highlights include:

  • Survey presentations on research programs from around Australia, including new exploration opportunities
  • Geoscience Australia mineral program update
  • An update and overview of the UNCOVER initiative
  • Details of exploration incentive schemes
  • Update from the Deep Exploration Technologies CRC
  • Update on CSIRO mineral programs

Special guest speakers Further details, including program, will be advertised closer to the date at www.australiaminerals.gov.au

For more information please contact Cameron Cairns, Geological Survey of Victoria

E: cameron.cairns@ecodev.vic.gov.au

P: 03 9452 8972

 

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