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NT

SEG workshop: Geophysics in Geothermal Energy – Today and Tomorrow

Thursday, October 14, 2021
1400
1900

Geophysics in Geothermal Energy – Today and Tomorrow

12–14 October 2021 | Virtual Workshop

 

ASEG is pleased to announce its collaboration with SEG for the highly anticipated Geophysics in Geothermal Energy – Today and Tomorrow workshop is up on our website. Be a part of this highly-anticipated virtual event that will be taking place from 12–14 October. This provides us the opportunity to provide all ASEG Members to ATTEND virtually with an interactive an immersive experience and the ability to connect with like-minded individuals from across the globe.

 

ASEG members receive a special discounted price of $US320. In order to benefit from the above rates, they should contact Suba Jaganathan on sjaganathan@seg.org.

 

Our technical committee has created a special workshop that branches out into specific topics that run parallel to each other, thus attendees can curate and choose the session they would like to view. A recording will also be available within 24 hours for attendees to re-watch any session they have missed, thus providing an enriching and wholesome experience throughout the workshop. We encourage anyone involved in geoscience or geothermal resource exploration to join in on this informative conversation: seismic processers, petrophysicists, rock physicists, geologists, geophysicists, geomechanicists and reservoir engineers.

 

To view the entire technical programme, please visit our website where you can download it, or watch the video for what you can look forward to during the workshop:

REGISTER NOW

SEG workshop: Geophysics in Geothermal Energy – Today and Tomorrow

Wednesday, October 13, 2021
1400
1900

Geophysics in Geothermal Energy – Today and Tomorrow

12–14 October 2021 | Virtual Workshop

 

ASEG is pleased to announce its collaboration with SEG for the highly anticipated Geophysics in Geothermal Energy – Today and Tomorrow workshop is up on our website. Be a part of this highly-anticipated virtual event that will be taking place from 12–14 October. This provides us the opportunity to provide all ASEG Members to ATTEND virtually with an interactive an immersive experience and the ability to connect with like-minded individuals from across the globe.

 

ASEG members receive a special discounted price of $US320. In order to benefit from the above rates, they should contact Suba Jaganathan on sjaganathan@seg.org.

 

Our technical committee has created a special workshop that branches out into specific topics that run parallel to each other, thus attendees can curate and choose the session they would like to view. A recording will also be available within 24 hours for attendees to re-watch any session they have missed, thus providing an enriching and wholesome experience throughout the workshop. We encourage anyone involved in geoscience or geothermal resource exploration to join in on this informative conversation: seismic processers, petrophysicists, rock physicists, geologists, geophysicists, geomechanicists and reservoir engineers.

 

To view the entire technical programme, please visit our website where you can download it, or watch the video for what you can look forward to during the workshop:

REGISTER NOW

SEG workshop: Geophysics in Geothermal Energy – Today and Tomorrow

Tuesday, October 12, 2021
1400
1900

Geophysics in Geothermal Energy – Today and Tomorrow

12–14 October 2021 | Virtual Workshop

 

ASEG is pleased to announce its collaboration with SEG for the highly anticipated Geophysics in Geothermal Energy – Today and Tomorrow workshop is up on our website. Be a part of this highly-anticipated virtual event that will be taking place from 12–14 October. This provides us the opportunity to provide all ASEG Members to ATTEND virtually with an interactive an immersive experience and the ability to connect with like-minded individuals from across the globe.

 

ASEG members receive a special discounted price of $US320. In order to benefit from the above rates, they should contact Suba Jaganathan on sjaganathan@seg.org.

 

Our technical committee has created a special workshop that branches out into specific topics that run parallel to each other, thus attendees can curate and choose the session they would like to view. A recording will also be available within 24 hours for attendees to re-watch any session they have missed, thus providing an enriching and wholesome experience throughout the workshop. We encourage anyone involved in geoscience or geothermal resource exploration to join in on this informative conversation: seismic processers, petrophysicists, rock physicists, geologists, geophysicists, geomechanicists and reservoir engineers.

 

To view the entire technical programme, please visit our website where you can download it, or watch the video for what you can look forward to during the workshop:

REGISTER NOW

SA/NT tech talk: Crustal resistivity of the Mt Gambier subprovince: origins of the Newer Volcanics and implications for exploration in the Western Otway

Tuesday, October 5, 2021
1730
1900

Title: Crustal resistivity of the Mt Gambier subprovince: origins of the Newer Volcanics and implications for exploration in the Western Otway

Presenter: Sam Jennings

Location: Thomas Cooper Room, Coopers Alehouse, 316 Pulteney St, Adelaide

Date: Tuesday 5th October 2021

Time: 5:30 pm for a 6:15 pm start

Cost: Members and students free, non-members $10, includes finger food and drinks

Abstract:

The westernmost Mt Gambier subprovince of southeast Australia's Newer Volcanics Province represent the most recent eruptions of a continental, intraplate volcanic province. Recent magnetotelluric (MT) models in the wider region reveal an extensive conductor beneath Central Victoria as well as a separate, crustally-bound region of low resistivity beneath the Mt Gambier subprovince. To better resolve this western conductor, 49 new broadband MT sites are collected at 25 km spacing and crustal resistivity is modelled using the latest 3D inversion algorithms. An extensive region of low resistivity (<100 Ω m) is revealed and interpreted as the footprint of rising magmatic fluids that cause widespread alteration of Delamerian crust. Spatial alignment of this feature with step-like sub-lithospheric topography lend credence to theories of edge-driven convection and shear-driven upwelling as causal mechanisms for melt generation. A localised zone of even lower resistivity (< 10 Ω m) in the mid-crust beneath the town of Casterton, Victoria is interpreted as small amounts of partial melt. In this presentation, I'll discuss the origins of the NVP, the role of complex basement structures in providing fluid pathways and the implications of a distal melt source for exploration in the Western Otway Basin.

ASEG NT - Interpreting high-resolution aeromagnetic data to aid mapping undercover and structural analysis of the Tanami Region and northwest Aileron Province

Tuesday, March 23, 2021
1600
1700

We have a new webinar on Wednesday 23 March, 4pm AEDT NT is bringing you a talk by Teagan Blaikie and Helen McFarlane of CSIRO on Interpreting high-resolution aeromagnetic data to aid mapping undercover and structural analysis of the Tanami Region and northwest Aileron Province.

Register now: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_Q4dRbOExQEuiV8tHkm9CKA

ASEG Webinar - SA/NT Branch: Searching for the Beaumont Children and Other Adventures in Unmarked Grave Detection

Tuesday, June 2, 2020
1230 AEST
1330 AEST

Branch hosting the event: SA/NT

Title: Searching for the Beaumont Children and Other Adventures in Unmarked Grave Detection

Presenter: Dr Ian Moffat

Date: Tuesday 2nd June 12:30 pm AEST

 

Abstract:

The reliable detection of unmarked graves is one of the most important challenges faced by community groups, industry and law enforcement agencies. Burials are ubiquitous in the archaeological and forensic record however these features are challenging to locate with conventional techniques. Geophysical methods are often used for this purpose due to their non-invasive nature and rapid site coverage however graves remain a difficult target due to their subtle response and small size. This presentation reviews a number of grave detection projects, including the search for the Beaumont Children and mapping WWII graves from the Battle of Tarawa, to discuss current best practice in this field.

Bio:

Ian Moffat is an ARC DECRA Senior Research Fellow in Archaeological Science at Flinders University where he undertakes research in the application of earth science techniques in archaeology. He has previously held research positions at the University of Cambridge and the Institute for Mediterranean Studies. Ian holds a PhD from the ANU and a BA and BSc (Hons) from UQ. In addition to his academic career he has worked at Ecophyte Technologies, Precipice Training and Archaeometry Pty Ltd.

 

SA/NT AGM 2020

Tuesday, March 24, 2020
1800
1900

I would like to advise you of an update on next week's talk and general meeting. Due to the current circumstances, we will now be holding the short AGM virtually via Zoom, and unfortunately will be postponing Dr. Ian Moffat's talk for now. 

 

Date: Tuesday, 24 March

Time: 6:00pm

Location: via Zoom videoconference

 

It would be fantastic to see as many of you as possible on Zoom to round off the previous year, and we will be happy to take any feedback or suggestions for the upcoming year. Instructions for joining the Zoom meeting are below.

 

Please consider joining the committee if you have ideas for our society - we are always looking for new faces, and I promise you it's a low time commitment. I've attached the nomination form here, and please feel free to contact me if you have any questions about joining.

 

I look forward to seeing you on Zoom, and apologies for the changes. 

 

INSTRUCTIONS FOR JOINING ZOOM MEETING

 

Join online using this link: https://zoom.us/j/993761357

Meeting ID: 993 761 357

 

If you have not used Zoom before, we recommend joining a few minutes early so you can set up and ensure your video and sound is working properly.

SA/NT Tech night: SEG honorary lecture - Regional to reservoir stress-induced seismic azimuthal anisotropy

Tuesday, February 11, 2020
1730
1900

Our first event for 2020 is a technical evening on Tuesday February 11th at the Coopers Alehouse with Dr Lisa Gavin, SEG honorary lecturer. 

Lisa will be presenting on 'Regional to reservoir stress-induced seismic azimuthal anisotropy.'

Lisa works at Woodside Energy in Perth and has great experience in the oil and gas industry. Her interests include seismic anisotropy, quantitative interpretation, 4D seismic, and rock physics. More information and an abstract can be found here.

 

Details: 

Time/Date: 5:30 pm for 6:15 pm start, Tuesday February 11th, 2020

Location: Thomas Cooper Room, Coopers Alehouse, 316 Pulteney St, Adelaide

Cost: Free for members and students, $10 for non-members, includes nibbles and drinks

NT Tech talk - Synchronous natural climate cycles of the Common Era, for Europe, China and globally – existence and implications for future temperature trends

Thursday, October 17, 2019
1600
1700

The talk can also be streamed to other members, if interested please contact one of the NT Division committee members.

 

Title: Synchronous natural climate cycles of the Common Era, for Europe, China and globally – existence and implications for future temperature trends

Author: Professor Michael Asten, School of Earth Atmosphere and Environment, Monash University. The talk summarises a joint effort with Kuan-Hui Elaine Lin (Univ of Taiwan) Carl Otto Weiss (PTB Braunschweig, Germany) Nicola Scafetta (Univ of Naples, Italy) and Alison Kelsey (U Qld), developed over three years at EGU 2017, 2018 and 2019.

 

Bio: Michael Asten is a Professor (retired) and ongoing Adjunct Senior Research Fellow in the School of Earth Atmosphere and Environment, Monash University, Melbourne.  He is a past-President of the ASEG, and served a recent three-year term as the AGC representative on the Australian Academy of Sciences UNCOVER Committee.  He has published 190 scientific papers.  He has developed passive seismic (microtremor) methods for 15 years, developing applications for earthquake hazard, and regolith characterization.   In the past six years he has applied signal processing methods to paleoclimate data sets with a view to quantifying past climate cycles and equilibrium climate sensitivity

 

Abstract:

We compare proxy temperature cycles contained in   data sets from European glaciation, China agricultural records, and two global proxy constructions.  A high correlation between European and China data sets, especially for 800-2000 CE, demonstrates a level of synchronicity beyond possible regional phenomena.  Spectral analysis shows a series of spectral peaks in all data sets consistent with those detected globally in cosmic ray flux, which supports the theory of natural climate cycles being partially under astronomical control. An interesting sidelight from the European and China data is observed temporal coincidence of social phenomena such as population decrease, starvation, disease and wars during phases of cooling, compared with human advancement during historical warmer phases. When the observed natural cycles are built into climate models, part of the global temperature increase of the past 170 years may be accounted for by natural cycles; we explore how this may influence estimates of climate sensitivity (the warming attributable to CO2 forcing for a doubling of atmospheric CO2).

 

Please don't hesitate to contact one of the NT Division committee members should you have any questions or wish to remote in for either presentation.

NT Tech talk - Comparisons of large igneous provinces (LIPs) and black shales in North China and Northern Australian cratons: Implications for paleogeographic reconstruction, paleoenvironment and subdivision of the geological time scale

Friday, September 27, 2019
1600
1700

The talk can also be streamed to other members, if interested please contact one of the NT Division committee members.

Title: Comparisons of large igneous provinces (LIPs) and black shales in North China and Northern Australian cratons: Implications for paleogeographic reconstruction, paleoenvironment and subdivision of the geological time scale

Author: Prof Zhang Shuanhong, Institute of Geomechanics, Chinese Academy of Geology

 

Bio: Shuan-Hong Zhang is a Professor of the Institute of Geomechanics, Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences and vice-director of Key Laboratory of Paleomagnetism and Tectonic Reconstruction, Ministry of Natural Resources in Beijing. His recent researches mainly focus on Meso-Neoproterozoic tectonics and paleogeographic reconstructions of the Nuna (Columbia) and Rodinia supercontinents using large igneous provinces (LIPs) and rifting sediments, as well as the potential environmental effect of LIPs during the Meso-Neoproterozoic period. During last 5 years, he has published over 12 scientific papers in international journals such as Geology, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Earth-Science Reviews, Precambrian Research, Tectonics, etc., and obtained two key research funds from the National Natural Science Foundation of China to study the Meso-Neoproterozoic tectonics and correlations of the LIPs and black shales during the "Boring Billon (1800 to 800 Ma).

 

Please don't hesitate to contact one of the NT Division committee members should you have any questions or wish to remote in for either presentation.

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